The poisonous lake on the ocean floor kills every creature that swims in

The special "lakes" are formed from the heavy concentration of salt on the seafloor, the size can be up to 20 km which is the grave buried all marine creatures accidentally falling into.

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Salt lake in Mexico gulf.
The world in the ocean has a lot of interesting things, from underground waterfalls to special lakes. In the picture is a "lake" formed separately from the surrounding area by the salt concentration. The characteristic of this place is that it has a separate shore and surface. Photo: LATimes.
Salt lake in Mexico gulf.
They often occur in the Gulf of Mexico, with the smallest lake less than 1 m in diameter, the largest lake up to 20 km long. In addition, these salty lakes are also found in the Red Sea and the Mediterranean. Photo: Ocean Exploration Trust.
Salt lake in Mexico gulf.
Today, the Gulf of Mexico is a deep basin, but during the Jurassic period (150-200 million years ago, it was shallow and secluded from the rest of the ocean.) As a result, the salt concentration here increased and as the evaporation is exhausted, a layer of salt up to 8 km thick covers the sea floor, which is still present but has been broken due to geological activities. When 2 tectonic plates moved, this gulf lower and the sea gets in. Image: Amusing Planet.
Salt lake in Mexico gulf.
When the Gulf of Mexico became the sea, the salt layer was covered with deposited sediment, preventing them from melting when the basin was flooded. The sediment layer is getting heavier, pressing on the salt layer, causing them to move (salt tectonic plates) and form domes, where the salt mass passes through the sediments to the sea floor. When this dome comes into contact with sea water, the salt dissolves and a separate area of water with high salt concentrations forms. That is the salt lake. Photo: Amusing Planet.
Salt lake in Mexico gulf.
The water in the lake is salty, denser and heavier than the surrounding waters, with the boundary visible to the naked eye. These lakes have the same effect as the lakes on the ground. For example, the lake surface has ripples created by the movement of sea water, like the ripples of a lake on the ground created by the wind. Photo: Nautinus Live.
Salt lake in Mexico gulf.
Some lakes have water so dense that marine life can "float" on their surface, like humans floating on the Dead Sea. When researchers' submarines arrive, they can "park" on the surface of the lake. Photo: Sott.
Salt lake in Mexico gulf.
Sometimes, these lakes have methane bubbles. The shores of these saline lakes often have oysters that live in symbiosis with bacteria capable of turning methande into carbon sugar. Photo: Nautinus Live.
Salt lake in Mexico gulf.
However, this lake is like poison to other marine creatures. They often do not have oxygen and are too salty for marine life to survive. Some lakes also contain poisons, killing any animals they touch. Photo: Blue Planet.
Salt lake in Mexico gulf.
High salt concentrations often cause the ill-fated animals that fall into them to become mummies. Scientists have found a crab that died eight years ago, but still has soft tissue inside. Photo: Labroots.

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