5 destinations own surreal beauty on earth

Some parts of the Atacama desert never rain, while caves in Mexico are always wet and contain 50,000-year-old bacteria.

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Danakil pan basin, Ethiopia

Danakil pan basin, Ethiopia

This place is one of the hottest and harshest places in the world. The average temperature here is usually at 34.5 - 50 degrees C with countless sulfur springs, geysers, acid lakes ... The yellow, orange and green sediments formed by volcanic activity heat spring water, bring sulfur and iron to the upper surface. Photo: Robert Harding.
Danakil pan basin, Ethiopia
Although it is considered a "hell" on earth, the rare beauty of this land has attracted many adventurous groups to explore. For centuries, local residents have been manually extracting salt in the area and transported by camels. Photo: Wild Frontiers.

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Naica mine, Mexico

Located at a depth of 300 m underground, Naica mine in Mexico is filled with giant plaster crystals formed over tens of thousands of years. Some crystals are longer than 9 m, the widest part up to 4 m in diameter. The temperature in the cave is often at  55 degrees C, humidity 90 - 99% and natural light can not reach. This is said to be the ideal environment for crystals to grow but dangerous to humans. Photo: Carsten Peter.
Naica mine, Mexico
Anyone who enters the cave must wear a special cooling suit and the time limit is 45 minutes. In 2017, a NASA scientist announced the discovery of bacteria trapped in crystals and they were up to 50,000 years old. Currently, the cave is closed to tourists to limit the disturbance of the internal environment. Photo: Travel And Leisure.

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Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia

The largest salt field in the world has an area of over 10,000 km2. At some point of the year, nearby lakes overflow, creating a thin layer of water that transforms the surface of the salt fields into a giant mirror. Photo: Fodor Travel Guide.
Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia
Tourists can visit this place on day tours or self-discovery and overnight at the hotel made of salt, about 25 km from Uyuni. Photo: Brendan van Son.
Wadi Rum, Jordan

Wadi Rum, Jordan

With red sandstone cliffs, the Wadi Rum valley in southern Jordan is considered one of the strangest landscapes on the planet. In Arabic, the desert region is named "moon valley". Photo: Robert Harding.
Wadi Rum, Jordan
The site was chosen as the setting for Mars in the science fiction film The Martian, which premiered in 2015. It is also the place to discover human paintings and inscriptions from 12,000 years ago. Part of the valley has become a UNESCO world heritage site. Photo: HiConsumption.
Atacama Desert, Chile

Atacama Desert, Chile

It is one of the driest places on earth with an annual rainfall of only about 15 mm, even some places where it has never rained. Guinness records confirm this is the driest desert, with an area of more than 100,000 km2 and most of which is covered by rocky hills, red and orange sand. Photo: National Geographic.
Atacama Desert, Chile
It is also home to the night sky in the world, according to the Guardian, ideal for watching the galaxy, attracting millions of visitors. Chile's Atacama Desert is often used by many space research agencies to simulate the environment on Mars. Photo: Babak Tafreshi.

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