Unique thousand candles lit Japan in the Ghost Festival

In August, the night sky of Japan glows during the Obon festival (or Vu Lan festival) with a sparkling street scene from thousands of lanterns and flowers.

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Obon festival, Japan.
There is a special time of the year, Japan suddenly becomes quiet. Non-human trains. Quiet trade centers. The roads are flooded with lanterns. It is around the time of Obon, the Japanese summer festival, to welcome the ancestors' souls back to their families, pray and express their respect to the merits of those who went ahead. Photo: Julianne.hide.
Obon festival, Japan.
Each area celebrates Obon festival at different times. In most parts of Japan, Obon usually takes place from August 13-16, called Hazuki or "Month of leaves". In some regions in Tokyo and Okinawa, this holiday is held in the middle of July of the lunar calendar. Photo: Natalya Erofeeva.
Obon festival, Japan.
Obon festival, Japan.
During the festival, thousands of lit paper lanterns will be brought to the family grave with the meaning of calling their ancestral souls home. This process is called mukae-bon. In some places, people also burn torches along the entrance or hang lights in front of the gate. Photo: Kayaesra.
Obon festival, Japan.
Obon festival, Japan.
Obon festival, Japan.
Obon festival, Japan.
Along with that, another tradition not to be missed when mentioning Obon is Bon Odori folk dance. This is a combination of many traditional dances and performed elaborately and intricately. Bon Odori, according to legend, is done as a means to express joy and happiness. Photos: Artem Mishukov, Julianne.hide, Pommy.
Obon festival, Japan.
Bon Odori performed around the stage is called yagura. Accordingly, a person will sing at the center of the yagura while the people around play different instruments. Taiko drums are most commonly used. This form of performance is called ondo or Japanese folk music. Photo: Japanese Friendship Garden.
Obon festival, Japan.
The dancers will dance in small circles around the yagura. Each region has its own dance. All Bon Odori performers often form circles around the yagura. The dance is sometimes performed in the procession and travels through the streets of the town. Photo: Mathathir Mohd Yasin.
Obon festival, Japan.
Odon is not only a festival of dances but also a festival of light. On the last day of the holiday, the night sky glowed by thousands of lanterns, the sparkling river surface with many flowers connecting each other along the water flow. The Japanese believe that when the flame is lit up into the sky, becoming a star, the deceased's soul is taken to heaven. Photos: Pinterest.

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