Sunday, September 29, 2019

238 tons of plastic waste invaded the islands of paradise

238 tons of plastic waste invaded the islands of paradise
Once thought to be one of the great places in the world, Cocos Islands in Australia are faced with huge amounts of plastic waste.

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238 tons of plastic waste invaded the islands of paradise
Plastic waste worldwide still exists in hard-to-reach places such as in the human body, ocean floor and internal organs of marine life. According to a scientific report published in Scientific Reports, researchers have pointed out the sad situation in the Cocos Islands, Australia's last pristine paradise. Here, the beach is filled with familiar household items, they are stacked on top of each other, completely hiding the sand. Photo: Webgram.life.
238 tons of plastic waste invaded the islands of paradise
In 2017, Dr. Jennifer Lavers, a research scientist at the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Research at the University of Tasmania, spent a year sorting out rubbish that washed up on the Cocos Islands coast. This place is an offshore area including 27 islands in the Indian Ocean. During 15 years of working on the island, Jennifer Lavers said that Cocos was particularly impressed by the huge accumulation of rubbish. Photo: Nverse 1.
238 tons of plastic waste invaded the islands of paradise
In a scientific report, Jennifer Lavers estimated the island had 238 tons of rubbish with 373,000 toothbrushes, 977,000 pairs of shoes and a new type of plastic with an endless amount, far exceeding efforts to eliminate. Sharing with Inverse, the doctor said: “When digging into sedimentary layers to see the extent of burial, I was surprised to find that the numbers sometimes did not decrease with depth. This seems to be contrary to what people often think. ” Photo: Inverse.
238 tons of plastic waste invaded the islands of paradise
In 2016, according to the Australian census, 544 people lived on Cocos Islands. Based on statistics, it will take approximately 4,000 years for local people to generate the amount of plastic waste currently available. Although shoes and toothbrushes are two prominent items in the trash, 93% of the debris on Cocos Island lies below the ground. In particular, 60% of the material is micro debris, with a size of 2-5 mm. Photo: Inverse.
238 tons of plastic waste invaded the islands of paradise
At a microscopic size, debris from the digestive tract enters the body of many marine creatures like turtles. A 2018 scientific report showed that when sea turtles consume a certain amount of plastic, they have a 50% risk of death. On Cocos Island, the endless flow of plastic significantly increases that mortality. Photo: Justdial.
238 tons of plastic waste invaded the islands of paradise
When plastic materials like shoes and old toothbrushes are buried at least 10 centimeters, they become part of the sediment. This new layer of plastic raises concerns for wildlife habitats. If the presence of plastic raises or lowers the temperature of the sediment, it makes the flow of water different, the humidity changes ... the animals living near the beach will be greatly affected. Photo: Stuff.co.nz.
238 tons of plastic waste invaded the islands of paradise
In 2017, local people installed a controversial incinerator. This action helps to treat waste but also increases the amount of toxic fumes in the air. People are encouraged to use limited and economical plastic goods. The Australian Government has funded beach cleaning projects. However, garbage still drifted from other places and continued to accumulate. In 2050, the world is estimated to have about 12 billion tons of plastic waste. After landfill, the removal of plastic waste is a difficult process. Photo: Yacht Fathom.

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