7 temples and pagodas with the most beautiful architecture in the world

Possessing unique architecture and thrilling historical legends, the ancient and famous temples below have always become the top tourist attractions in the world.

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Temple of Heaven, Beijing, China

1. Temple of Heaven, Beijing, China

Built from 1406 to 1420 during the reign of Yongle Emperor, the temple of heaven - also known as the Heavenly Yard - is located peacefully on a 267-hectare campus in the heart of Beijing. This is the place where the worship of heaven and earth take place, pray for favorable rain and wind, the peaceful nation of the Chinese emperors. Photo: Around the globe.
Temple of Heaven, Beijing, China
Temple of heaven is one of the typical works of ancient Chinese architecture, now a favorite destination for locals to meditate and practice Tai Chi.
Wat Rong Khun, Chiang Mai, Thailand

2. Wat Rong Khun, Chiang Mai, Thailand

Known locally as the "White Temple", Wat Rong Khun was once a heavily damaged temple until it was rebuilt by artist Chalermchai Kositpipat with his own money. Photo: KKday.
Wat Rong Khun, Chiang Mai, Thailand
Possessing many unique and mysterious features, Wat Rong Khun's architecture also has profound meanings about reincarnation. Symbolizing the "ultimate bliss realm," the temple's main hall is connected by a bridge over a small lake with hundreds of outstretched hands. The hands representing the concept of "greed and anger" always hold people to the shore of happiness. Photo: Kiran and Maddie.
Shwedagon Pagoda, Yangon, Myanmar

3. Shwedagon Pagoda, Yangon, Myanmar

It can be considered as the most sparkling temple in Asia when the entire 110 m high stupa is completely covered with gold. The top of the temple is studded with 4,531 diamonds, of which the largest one weighs 72 carats. Photo: Gody.
Shwedagon Pagoda, Yangon, Myanmar
Legend has it that the Shwedagon was built to store Buddha's hair. The temple grounds include hundreds of temples, stupas and colorful statues, reflecting the architectural style that lasted for nearly 2,500 years. Today, Shwedagon becomes the center of Buddhist and community activities in Myanmar. Photo: Projectmagellan.

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Borobudur, Java, Indonesia

4. Borobudur, Java, Indonesia

While Shwedagon shines brightly, Borobodur temple is somewhat more peaceful. Located in the Java valley in Indonesia, Borobodur dons a dark coat of stone with a peaceful appearance. Built in the Mahayana tradition around 800 AD, this is the largest Buddhist monument in the world. Photo: Wanderlust.
Borobudur, Java, Indonesia
Known for its stone bells and carved Buddha statues overlooking the valley, it is hard to believe that this massive structure is hidden for centuries under volcanic ash and jungle. Now Borobudur is a popular pilgrimage site for Buddhists, tourists and the pride of Indonesians. Photo: Themandagies.
Harmandir Sahib Temple, Amritsar, India

5. Harmandir Sahib Temple, Amritsar, India

The most sacred building in Sikh religion, Harmandir Sahib, also known as "Golden Temple", was built in the 16th century to mark the location next to a lake where Buddha and Guru Nanak, the founder of Sikhism, used to meditate.
Harmandir Sahib Temple, Amritsar, India
The temple is a great mix of Hindu and Islamic architectural styles with the highlight is the dome covered in 750 kg of gold. The impressive feature of the temple is lake that is said to be capable of healing, attracting many pilgrims around the world to bathe in the sacred water. Photo: Wanderlust.
Angkor Wat, Cambodia

6. Angkor Wat, Cambodia

Built with the original purpose as a Hindu temple in the 12th century, Angkor Wat temple complex is considered the largest religious monument in the world, covering an area of 162.6 ha with over 100 vast temples. Photo: REI.
Angkor Wat, Cambodia
Angkor Wat is famous for its grandeur and harmony in architecture with exquisite bas-reliefs and countless decorative motifs on the walls. It was honored to receive the title of World Cultural Heritage by UNESCO in 1992. Photo: Urlaubstracker.
Taktsang Palphug Monastery, Bhutan

7. Taktsang Palphug Monastery, Bhutan

Widely known as Tiger Nest, Taktsang Palphug complex is located on a cliff high at 3,120 m above the sea level in Paro Valley, Bhutan. Photo: Earth Trekkers.
Taktsang Palphug Monastery, Bhutan

Taktsang Palphug Monastery, Bhutan
Paro Taktsang Monastery was built around Taktsang Senge Samdup cave, where it is said that Padmasambhava was meditating for three months when he went to meditate at Paro Taktsang in the 8th century. To get to Taktsang Palphug Monastery, you have to cross the extremely difficult mountain road. Photo: Brewing.itineraries.

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