Life in Pyongyang under the lens of a Dutch photographer

Hartmann's photographs taken on Pyongyang often seem quiet look, many people feel the loneliness in the works.

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Pyongyang
Dutch photographer Eddo Hartmann first came to Korea in 2014, after a year and a half of procedures and application for entry. So far, he has 4 times to this country. Above is a man waiting for a bus on the streets of Pyongyang, this photo was taken this year.
During the last visit of the Dutch photographer, tensions between North Korea and the United States were heightened. Hartmann sees this moment, taking photos and videos in Pyongyang is more difficult than ever. Each of his steps was accompanied by a guide.

Above is the entrance to a skating rink in Pyongyang in 2016.
Pyongyang
He said international tourists will not be allowed to take photos of unfinished buildings here. Every photo is carefully checked. The above photo was taken by the photographer in a museum in 2016.
Pyongyang
The picture above is the swimming pool in the Changgwangwon complex. At this moment, Hartmann expects this place to attract many visitors. However, this space is still empty after a year the photographer returned.
Pyongyang
In 2012, when Hartmann first saw images of the Korean parade, he yearned to learn about the lives of the people here. Above is Mangyongdae Children's Palace in Pyongyang, taken in 2014.
Pyongyang
During his first trip in 2014, Hartmann photographed many buildings in North Korea. In later times, he focused on the overall view of the country's daily life.
Pyongyang
Above is the entrance to Kim Nhat Thanh Stadium. Hartmann's pictures of Pyongyang often seem quiet. Many people said that they felt the loneliness in the works.
Pyongyang
This photo was taken at Kim Nhat Thanh Square in 2017. Hartmann chatted with acquaintances who grew up in East Germany before the fall of the Berlin Wall. Having been to North Korea, these people perceive that East Germany in the past and North Korea have similarities.

"Everyone wears clothes in a certain way, looks the same way - it's more of a collective spirit, more than an individual," says Hartmann.
Pyongyang
The picture is the central district in Pyongyang. Hartmann hopes to come back here a few more times in the future.

"25 million people are living here and doing great things. They love each other, have children, take them to school and live a simple life," Hartmann said of his feelings.

Life in Pyongyang under the lens of a Dutch photographer Life in Pyongyang under the lens of a Dutch photographer Reviewed by Duy Khiêm on September 02, 2019 Rating: 5

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