The timid foliage phenomenon creates a winding river on the trees

The timid foliage phenomenon creates a winding river on the trees
The naturally occurring phenomenon known as the timid canopy has created a stunning visual effect that looks like rivers winding when viewed from below.

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The timid foliage phenomenon creates a winding river on the trees
Tree gaps were captured in a series of stunning photos. This strange phenomenon occurs when the tree foliages grow completely without touching each other, light can shine through creating the illusion of the winding river. Scientists have not given an exact reason for this appearance since it was first discovered in the 1920s. Photo: Flickr.
The timid foliage phenomenon creates a winding river on the trees
The effect usually occurs between plants of the same type but has also been detected among several different plants. Some theories that it is the result of the upper branches rubbing together. Trees in the windy areas can be damaged by colliding with each other, creating scratches. This may be the cause of the awkward reaction of the trees. Photo: Colossal.
The timid foliage phenomenon creates a winding river on the trees
In his book The Habits of Eucalyptus in 1955, jungler MR Jacobs from Australia detailed his studies on the shy canopy model. He argued that plant growth patterns are very sensitive to abrasion, leading to gaps in the foliage. Photo: JSTOR Daily.
The timid foliage phenomenon creates a winding river on the trees
In 1986, Dr. Miguel Franco observed that the branches of conifers of Japanese spruce and pine were physically damaged by abrasion, causing the young shoots to die. In an article published in the journal Philosophical Transitions Of The Royal Society B, Franco said: "The foliage does not recognize the presence of a neighbor can lead to physical damage due to abrasion for both trees ". Photo: Of The Live Forever.
The timid foliage phenomenon creates a winding river on the trees
How to create large gaps at the leaf edges can help prevent damage. In certain cases, this will give a visual impression of the shyness of the canopy. However, this theory has been rejected by some in the scientific community. Other theories suggest that timid foliage may be the reaction of each other of many neighboring plants to the light source. Photo: Stars Insider.
The timid foliage phenomenon creates a winding river on the trees
Plants can recognize their proximity by detecting specific light frequencies thanks to the activity of phytochromic photoreceptors. Other scientists argue that the canopy does not touch each other to prevent the spread of leaf-eating insects like ants. Many plants avoid growing toward other trees to compete for light to grow. Photo: Pinterest.

The timid foliage phenomenon creates a winding river on the trees The timid foliage phenomenon creates a winding river on the trees Reviewed by Duy Khiêm on October 09, 2019 Rating: 5

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